Comme des Organismes

A Zeitguised reimagination of the Spring 2014 Women’s Collection by Comme des Garçons / Rei Kawakubo.

The motion triptych shows an interpretation of what the initial concepts would have looked liked if they were not realised as a line of runway clothes but spontaneously realized themselves as autonomous life forms.

archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

This year marks the 81st Fete du Citron à Menton, the annual Lemon Festival in Menton, France (previously featured here). The theme for this year’s festival is “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”. Over 300 artists worked with 145 tons of citrus fruit to create a variety of awesome sculptures inspired by Jules Verne’s classic 19th century science fiction novel about the adventures of Captain Nemo. We’re particularly fond of the giant octopus and squid, but the Nautilus, whale and Nemo himself are pretty great too.

Photos by Lionel Cironneau, Sebastien Nogier, and Olivier Anrigo respectively.

[via NY Daily News]

prostheticknowledge

prostheticknowledge:

Reverberating Across the Divide

Art tech project by Madeline Gannon for Madlab explores designing virtual forms through gestures, which are then physically realized with 3D printing - video embedded below:

Reverberating Across the Divide reconnects digital and physical contexts through a custom chronomorphologic modeling environment. The modeling interface uses a three phase workflow (3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing) to enable a designer to craft intricate digital geometries around pre-existing physical contexts.

Chronomorphology –– like its nineteenth-century counterpart chronophotography –– is a composite recording of an object’s movement. Instead of a photograph, however, the recording medium here is a full three-dimensional model of the object — a virtual creature simulated within a digital environment. This virtual creature exists as a 3D printable module; it is constructed as a closed mesh, with a spring skeleton that prevents self-intersections. The composite, chronomorphologic model (of the virtual creature over time) retains these printable properties at each time-step. Therefore, no matter how intricate or complex, the digital geometry will always be exported as a valid, 3D printable mesh.

The chronomorphologic modeling environment facilitates the rapid generation of baroque and expressive spatial forms that both respond and expand on existing physical contexts. By mediating 3D scanning and 3D printing through the modeling environment, the designer has a streamlined workflow for oscillating between virtual and analog environments. This ease between digital design and physical production provides a framework for rapidly exploring how subtle changes in the virtual environment, physical environment, or designer’s gestures can create dynamic variation in the formal, material, and spatial qualities of a generated design.

Examples developed with this project includes not only wearables, but also possibilities for sculptural motifs.

You can find out more about the project at Madlab here